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or relief that at least the election didn't end up in a situation where obama won the electoral vote but romney got the popular vote. i agree that would have been bad. it would have denied the democrat the clear mandate. the implication from the right wing seemed to have been had the republican candidate won the popular vote, there would be trouble of some undefined type. what the heck did that mean? yes, we've had to put up with this ridiculous secession petitions out there, the texas version having been signed by over 100,000 people since election day, but could the right have gone further had it been armed with a popular vote victory? there does seem to be a difference in the two parties. when al gore lost 12 years ago, he ignored his 600,000 vote victory in the popular vote. he just learned to live with the irony. republicans have carefully forgotten this bit of history, but i have real doubts those on the angry, demanding right would have been so quietly obedient to constitutional law. there's something out there on the right right now that is still uneasy with this defeat. sear
obama, so they're blaming that liberal romney. that northeastern liberal crowd. texas senator-elect ted cruz is crueler still. he accuses romney of going out there and french kissing obama. yes, they're blaming romney now. they were blaming chris christie for working with obama during hurricane sandy. now they're blaming romney for dancing with him through the election. get it? the strict orthodox side of the republican party are blaming the candidate himself for giving away their virtue. ed rendell is the former governor of pennsylvania, and msnbc political analyst. matt kibbe is the president of freedomworks. governor and matt, this is the most unusual pairing i've ever been part of, you and matt kibbe, you and the man of the northeast establishment, a moderate governor of pennsylvania. here is matt railing at the ramparts against all you represent. this should be interesting. the right fights back. since the election a lot of republicans' soul searching has focused on the need to broaden the political base of the republican party. fiscal and social conservatives are saying that's the
government austerity on the rest of the country. all three collapsed in this election in 2012. now they have to decide which is strong enough to survive. my personal theory is the business wing was always the strongest and will be the surviving wing and you can hear that in the talk about loosening up on immigration. the business wing wants loser immigration rules. i think they're the one that's going to try to assert themselves but that's a cross purposes with the tea party wing that is dead set against immigration. >> don't trust the goodwill of the business community. the labor unions ought to be organizes, everybody comes in legal or not. the business community doesn't want real work, fast as they can and cheap as they can. >> to john about history. you and i remember i think back in 1988 as far back then, the democrats had won a race, this is a race, the key thing is not that you lose or lose by a lot, didn't lose by a huge amount, when you lose when you think you're going to win. that's when you rethink your party. just like dukakis, everybody thought he has it, going to work, the new
in this election. what made them think so? the polls were tight but favoring president obama. what north star was guiding the gop convincing them that the white house would be back in their hands in january? back where their hankerings were convinced it belonged? there was a darker side to this deep sense of executive entitlement, the sense they had the same assumed access to the white house as they did in the corporate dining room. it's more than a bit frighting. i have heard at least one person of the right state their pained belief or relief that at least the election didn't end up in a situation where obama won the electoral vote but romney got the popular vote. i agree that would have been bad. it would have denied the democrat the clear mandate. the implication from the right wing seemed to have been had the republican candidate won the popular vote, there would be trouble of some undefined type. what the heck did that mean? yes, we've had to put up with this ridiculous secession petitions out there, the texas version having been signed by over 100,000 people since election day, but cou
-faced. it has to do -- people at headquarters, they show up at election night, unless the guy or woman loses and they get excited about the guy near election night because they want a job. they want something. they want to be loved by the winner. then they treat the guy like a ticket at off-track betting on the floor you're stomping around on. is that the best case against the case being made against the republican party, it's a bunch of people just not loyal? that's what he's saying. >> absolutely, chris. look, i've been through this time and time again, that people are measuring the drapes before the first debate ends, especially if the nominee does a very good job. >> now they're measuring the crepe. >> true. mitt romney unfortunately never had any -- a loyal following, if you will, except for the folks in boston. the conservatives never trusted him. they didn't even trust him when he got the republican nomination back in the spring of this year. the point is these individuals are opportunists, both on the republican side and also on the democratic side. they don't care about loyalty. the
you actually think that the people iran in 2010 and got elected or for that matter the people iran before and have now ascended to positions believe that no is a solution or that they were elected to not do things as opposed to do things? >> well, again, from the class of 2010 and now i refer to the 87 freshmen, the so-called deep party class of the 100th of congress, i think their belief is that they are doing precisely what the people who elected them with some do which was several back all obama initiatives, to cut spending, a lot of them doubt that the debt ceiling should not be increased under any circumstances, and to that degree they feel like that was a failure. but, no, they basically believe that their job is first to obstruct barack obama and then once there is a republican president in place to pass those initiatives that create a better business climate, more and more deregulation, the funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. yes. i think that they do believe. and, of course, after you flash toward a bit, i expect to will talks about the de
reelection in two years. you can read too much into this election. this was not a mandate. this was a popular vote to% election, even electoral votes when he looked at the states, separated by 2%, 3%, 4%. this was not some kind of major reelection when like reagan had, like even clnton had. clinton might think, won by 8%, reagan nine, ten, 11%. there is no real mandate here. so i can't see the republicans getting too overwhelmed by these ads. the president's new popularity numbers just came out. it's 51 percent. that is a pretty small jump for a guy you just won an election. tom: t only people are really concerned, two years from now there is another whole house -- house members that will be reelected. >> and they have to go back to district that elected them to lower taxes. so you go back to that district. you promise you'll never vote for a tax increase. taxes go up. tom: two years later. >> and membersof congress think about themselves and their reelection. tom: let me ask you bout retail. on the cusp of thanksgiving, but friday coming up. all kinds of issues. you are telling me before we
the latino vote and, ultimately, the election during the presidential primaries. he was part of a panel on immigration policy and the gop. from the american enterprise institute, this is 90 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. my name is nick schulz, i'm the dewitt wallace fellow here at the american enterprise institute, and i'm the editor of american.com, aei's flagship online magazine. want to thank you for coming to our event today, conservatives and immigration reform, now what? i'd like to thank, before i get started, i'd like to thank my colleague dan rothschild here at aei who had the idea for doing this event and helped bring it all together. dan's had an issue in this for a long time, as have i, and i think it's timely and important that we start talking about some of these things. you know, there's been a tension at the heart of the conservative movement's approach to immigration for at least as long as i've polled politics and -- followed politics and a lot longer than that. there are two influential camps that have jockeyed for control to define th
. let me give you the phone numbers again. how did you vote in the last election? did you vote with the intention of one-party rule in your state legislature? what are your priorities, if so? let me read this -- on a federal level, folks believe a divided government has republicans in control of the house and democrats in control of the senate and president obama reelected to a second term in the white house. on a federal level, people believed compromise is possible. not so, says the new york times, on the state level. what are your thoughts on this? we also posted the question on our facebook page. we have a couple comments -- you can post your comments as well on facebook if you want to participate that way, or send us an e-mail or a tweet. this is inside the new york times and they have a chart showing the outcomes of the 2012 elections -- that's how it breaks down. norma is a democrat in st. petersburg, florida. what is your state legislature like and what are your priorities? caller: i voted democratic. i believe that obama offered than did the republican party. the candi
, these are noises that you made to sound conciliatory after an election, and we think back to 2009. the republicans sounded very conciliatory in the days after president obama's reelection when he was holding a high approval rating, but by april or may of his first year that that had melted away. so right now is happy talk from the republicans. we will see whether that materializes into votes. lou: such happy talk, why aren't there more smiling faces in the republican party? >> pretty unhappy talk from what i can tell, and to this point pretty frivolous. you see members of the united states senate demand is not even their negotiations, but taking a timeout to beat up on grover norquist to is some on elected activists type who was not a player in this and does not have a seat at the negotiating table, was not elected. what does he have to do with any of this? is seems to me this is the opportunity for the republicans in the house, but also to some extent in the senate to explain what they want to know what kind of entitlement cuts that will demand. instead they're beating a boy norquist. lou: we als
had. it is where they were before the election. they gotta wake up and see the election, change things and they actually have to meet democrats somewhere in the middle. >> bill: i would hope. i would hope. new york times this morning, front page of the business section in terms of closing loopholes, romney was never specific about which one. new york times is saying that they know -- now we know one of the ones they're targeting. the headline is a tax break once sacred is now seen as vulnerable. what they're talking about is the mortgage interest deduction. there was no doubt it is on the table. it is one they're targeting rather than raise tax rates on the wealthy, they're going to either limit or get rid of the mortgage interest deduction. which is the most popular one. >> the most popular one. politically difficult i think. that's really the problem with romney's entire approach that said we'll just create revenue by closing loopholes. you go down the list of the largest loopholes and pretty quickly, you get to
of the vote in the, won 52 percent of the presidential election. >> it is the same with obama, it is everywhere, democracy means that of course there will be a specific percentage for 1 and 1 shall win, but after a the election it is over. now, all of the protesters have to wait for years for the one who is elected, the president to support him, until he proves he will succeed or not. >> but no american president has ever controlled the legislative and executive branches of government and then made himself immune to judicial oversight. >> it is that consolidation of power that makes some he jinxes not only angry, but fearful. >> dr. shdi, led protests during the revolution that yeers that toppled the long time dictator hosni mubarek. >> now, he feels betrayed. >> he swore when he was elected and he was sworn to respect the law and the constitution that he has been elected. >> both president morsi's supervisor all righters and his critics are planning more protests next week if they again turn violent it is worrying because for decades egypt has been a pillar of stability here
it very, very neat and controversial election that was decided that the house of representatives. he wanted to speak to this idea that we were all americans again and certainly that's the way i wish we would feel after the storm and aftermath of that. so we can learn from these moments americans are very good at coming together. doesn't feel that way right now in the midst of this election, but we also have this extraordinary moment, where we have a crisis and moment of division butting heads against each other. i am hopeful we can learn from our history and see that americans to respond to a crisis like this. >> host: as kenneth davis alluded to, the reason he's in new york and both tedious and washington is because of sandy. we had studio issuescome the sore little patch together for this "in depth" with kenneth davis. your most recent "don't know much about the american presidents" is about the american president and you talk about a couple elections. i went to took about 1800 the election of james k. polk versus henry clay. you compare those talking about how vicious they were. i
clip] >> i want to thank every american who participated in this election. [applause] whether you voted for the very first time -- [cheers and applause] -- or waited in long for a very long time -- by the way, we have to fix that. host: we are talking about remedies to speed up the voting process. the first call comes from michael in oregon on the line for democrats. caller: we have a very simple process here. they send us -- we get a letter in the mail. it says who we have to vote for and we send it back in. host: so there is no waiting in line? caller: none. host: do you feel like that is the best way to go? caller: i think it is great. all you have to do is register. make sure that your address is registered. they send you a ballot in the mail and you send it back in. host: our next call comes from larry on the line for independent. give me a remedy to speed of the voting process. caller: i think we could probably moved it to veterans day -- november 11. a couple of days around it. three days of voting, kind of like a national holiday. the other way i think is, i really like what the
is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. he goes to georgetown. from georgetown to becomes the arkansas candidate and then goes to oxford. he's an incredible success everywhere, but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he's attracted to the kind of women as mother directs in two, the beauty queens, the ones who are flirtatious, who are attractive and that's really where his eyes at 10 until he comes back to be a law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> imacs, author and lecturer, kenneth davis, cleaned author of the don't know much about serious talks about history, geography and more. the selling off there has written 12 adult nonfiction books including the hidden history, and nation rising and is 2012 release, "don't know >> host: author kennetn presidents." >> host: author kenneth davis, where did they don't know much series of books come fro
vote in last month's election. sitting down today with small business leaders at the white house meaning tomorrow with the ceos of larger firms and middle class taxpayers, and then a true campaign-style rally held in a toy factory on the outskirts of philadelphia friday where the president continues his christmas themed attacks against republicans and their positions. a meeting to hash out a deal with congressional leaders not on the president's schedule as of this moment. we'll take all of this up here tonight, and republicans taking action to resolve at least part of the illegal immigration dilemma, a strong moderate alternative to the democrats' dream act proposed, a dramatic republican pivot on the issue led by two outcoining republican senators who, today, introduced the achieve act. senator hitchenson of texas works on the legislation for almost a year, among our guests here tonight, and the republican party, some say it's in disarray after the presidential defeat. what's next for the party? we examine the -- what we call republican reset. what will it look like? rnc commun
approach on the fiscal cliff, saying the elect is over. it's time to stop campaigning and start talk. some republicans are telling the president, show us your hand. martha: not over the cliff yet but perhaps headed there. good morning. i'm martha maccallum. the minority leader mitch mcconnell called the president out for what he says is a campaign-style blitz instead of negotiations between both sides. >> rather than sitting down with lawmakers and working out an agreement he's back on the campaign trail. we are not going to solve this problem by creating villians and drumming up outrage. >> he will be out trying to i'm sure zero in on those states represented by members of the house and the senate to try to get public support. bill: democrats upping the ante, looking to raise taxes, protect entitlements and raise the debt ceiling all at the same time. stuart varney, hello, there, sir. you think there has been a shift in those negotiations. >> i don't mean a shift in position. i mean a shift in focus, what they are focusing in on on the last couple days it's been taxes now it seems to be w
the iranians, remember they have a presidential election coming up, and if there's a deal cut and it's associated to someone who might be running for president, you better believe it. the opponents will try to attack it and try to undermine them. we've seen that will before. this is an executive issue. it's also an united nations issue and a p-5 plus one. i think the president of the united states comes in and says, look, we have the leaders of france and britain and china and russia and the u.n. and we're trying to prevent nuclear weapons, you know, you should probably not meddle in this. that's a winnable argument. i think particularly coming out of this -- obama out of a strong election. no one like gaddafi. no one liked libya. no one liked the soviets. it's doable. >> to partially answer the same question. the issue for many in congress is whether this negotiation quote-unquote allows iran to continue enriching at the 3.5% level or not. the historical position of the united states going back to the early 2000's has been that there should be a suspension of all enrichment as a con
. he will also talk about the 2012 election and recent meetings at the white house between congressional leaders and president obama. this is an hour and 20 minutes. >> we are delighted to have grover norquist with us. of course, he is president of americans for tax reform but in the spirit of full disclosure, he is also a member of our board of directors and a very important colleague. grover spoke here several months ago, i should say here at the center, but not in this room because we moved -- there may be some glitches, so i apologize in advance. i am sure we will do better next time. however, grover talked about taxes, u.s. economic policy. but that was about taxes and the electoral campaign. now we had elections and the taxes are at the center of a very important political debate and at the center of negotiations between the obama administration and congress, particularly the republican controlled house. as i watched the president during his recent press conference and listened to leaders of the house, i think everybody agrees it would be highly desirable to reach a c
the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama administration is re-using digital information gathered for the campaign to rally support now. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with more talk of avoiding the much-discussed fiscal cliff. but as november wound down, the president suggested an agreement on taxes and spending could come in time for the holidays. >> i believe that both parties can agree on a frame work that does that in the coming weeks. in fact my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> you know me, i was born with the glass half full. i'm an optimist. >> brown: hopeful sig
times to -- in 105 times to change tallies on election night. which explains his refusal to accept the results. if karl rove doesn't resign, the evidence goes to a certain painfully bored nemesis hanging out in an embassy in london. [ ♪ dramatic ♪ ] >> but more importantly, they're going to give the evidence to the fbi. >> stephanie: the frog marching of karl rove might happen. >> in 2004, at 11:13, all of the servers crashed and it bounced to another server in tennessee. the votes came back suddenly. kerry was leading in a landslide. >> stephanie: i'm not a constitutional scholar which i know shocks both of you. can john kerry be retroactively named president after president obama? >> no. >> stephanie: why not? >> because. >> stephanie: okay. >> no, he can't be. >> stephanie: fine, you're constitutional scholars but i'm not. >> the server crashed at 11:13 they bounced over to -- i don't know where they went -- but they were able to keep them from flipping the votes. that's why rove was so stunned
, it went very well. the problem was that was before thanksgiving after the election. and since that time, there's been little progress with the republicans, which is a disappointment to me. >> well, the market didn't exactly like what they heard there either. the dow lost nearly 90 points today. much of it in reaction to harry reid's dismal statement. i got an e-mail with it all in caps, the market is coming in on these headlines from harry reid. this matters, every word they say matters and white house press secretary jay carney was on the defense today. he pointed out as he had done yesterday that the president spoke on the phone with senate majority leader harry reid and john boehner over the weekend. and besides carney says, the president has to talk directly to the american people. >> it is vitally important that ordinary americans actively engage in this debate because the outcome of these negotiations and the hopeful product of these negotiations are the product that we hope emerges from these negotiations will profoundly affect their lives. >> so is the president, the missing ing
, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions coming one day after egypt help broker a cease-fire in the gaza strip. former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. john bolton joined us earlier to weigh in saying it's no coincidence. >> he didn't wait but one day before moving here. so whether he had a wink and a nod from president obama or whether whether he felt emboldened in the wake of the cease-fire to believe the u.s. would not criticize him or do anything major to stop this power grab, i think we'll have to find out in the next few days. the timing is not coincidental. you can bet on that. >> heather: coming up the latest reaction from the white house to the turmoil
: >> it's funny to watch a senator or congressman who got himself elected by promising the citizen of his state that he would go to washington to reform government and not to pay taxes. when the going gets rough he wanted to debt ceiling increase. the same cast of chakts are turns in the homework for the second tyne two years later and there's not a snowball rolling. the good news is the people that gave a commitment to the american voters. for four years president obama has not reined in spending. all he did is demand $1.6 trillion of tax increase so he can spend more money, not reining in spending. we need focus on spending problems because that's the problem we have. >> warren buffett wrote this fascinating piece in the "new york times" today. you're familiar with it today. suppose they come to you with an investment idea. i'm in it. i think you should be, too. would your reply be this? it depends on what my tax rate is on the gain we're going to make. if the tax isn't too high, i'd rather leave the money in my savings account. war len buff set says only in norquist imagine kwis. why a
. that is what they are elected for. i just do not think the states would benefit from having grand elections, more spending, more commercials and when the money needs to go directly to the people. we also need to be wary of cutting spending on the platform, cuts in programs of obama's platform. host: do you think the states should use their line of communication of congress or the white house? caller: i think we need to trust the congress and believe that we have elected them to do the state's business and trust them to do it. host: let's go to mike. caller: i think the states already have several budgets to their elected officials. if the governor wants to have a say on the budget, get a hold of their elected officials, their congressman, bring them to the governor's office and laid the lot down to them on what the what the congressman to go back and portray in washington. host: let's hear what marie has to say on the independent line. caller: i think only the blue states should have a say because the blue states contribute overwhelmingly more money to the federal government. the red states
a low profile. sheraton did not. urged on by grant, he alone removed to elected officials who defied congress' policies. fired scores of them. to the governor's of louisiana and texas. there indian warrior slaughtering settlers in western kansas and eastern colorado. it was here he began prosecuting with brutal effect for the decorate that -- strategy he implemented in the shenandoah valley, one of total war. as waged in the shenandoah valley. it was a milder form of the cruder -- they were in agreement that in inflicting suffering on southern civilians would more quickly end the bloodshed. in urging sheraton to conduct the war in the shenandoah, if the war is to last another year, we the valley to remain barren waste. he a barn full of wheat i would rather sooner lose the barn and wheat than my son. unlike the broader sill burning as it was called horrified and bittered valley residences. one described how the innovators came up the valley sweeping everything before them like a hurricane. there's nothing left from the horse down to the chick. en. raid the new settlement on the plain
, this is unprecedented whether right or wrong, but it's something that was done not only during the elections, but a statement made by the president more than once, and i think it was in connection of promises made also to the israeli prime minister. how, will president obama fulfill the promise? wiggle out of it? absolutely implement it whether it's militarily or through containment policy, and what are they doing from my point of view, one of the reasons or a fascinating part about the gaza operation is that, a, they are giving hamas a lead in creating the new dynamics or dictating dynamics in an alliance of the muslim brotherhood leadership's be it in egypt or turkey, and it's probably the move to undermind the palestinian authority because he's going to the united nations asking for the status of the states, observer state, but the change of subject, at least by the israelis away from iran and syria, on to gaza, to me, is a very fascinating development. is it temporary or going to be an ongoing -- how long is that change of subject? sometimes leaders and security people know better. they
an election in january, so there's no real hope that there will be a longer-term agreement before that election, and after that it is anyone's guess as to what type of an agreement they will have here and will anybody be able to forge an agreement that will lead to a lasting peace? that is still a very big question going forward, rick. rick: conor powell live on the ground in jerusalem, thanks. heather: well, u.n. ambassador susan rice defending those early comments on the benghazi terror attacks just days after the raid on the u.s. consulate. ambassador rice went on five sunday talk shows and said that the attack grew out of a spontaneous to protest over an anti-muslim film. and now she says those remarks were based on the intelligence she was given. >> when discussing the attacks against our facilities in benghazi, i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary and that our investigations would give us the definitive answers. heather: national security correspondent jennifer griffin
obama running for the presidency in 2008. if he had lost the senate election, that is the level of national maturity we are talking about here. >> profiling historic and modern leaders to show the lessons that can be learned from those that have had the greatest impact on the issues of their time. sunday at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern part of the holiday weekend on c-span to. up next, the history of the presidential appointment process with public policy professor james sister that criticizes the current confirmation process and it talks about how it can be improved. this is just under an hour. >> what happens the day after the election when the president of homes of pointing? it will happen one way or the other. the romney transition team has been working on this for months and i am sure they are ready for it. the obama administration is ready to fill vacancies. this will have rebels all the way down the hierarchy. what i would like to discuss tonight is how we got from where we are, the politics of patronage, the challenges of recruiting political appointees , how the syste
respect. he promised the people of egypt democracy when his party and he was elected president. >> reporter: egyptian president expanded his powers and placed himself above judicial oversay the sight after the cease-fire. egypt said it was designed to hold those accountable of those in corruption and crimes in the previous regime. but one leading senator was asked what message president obama should deliver to the egyptian leader? >> he has to express those concerns and say, obviously, we want this -- change to be not just democratic, but to also be supportive of stability and also to be protecting of minorities and human rights in egypt. >> reporter: the egyptian stock market taking a dive on the first day of trading after the action. it dropped more than 9%. >> shannon: all right. we'll keep an eye on it. president obottommal meet with the congressional leaders for a plan aimed at avoiding the fiscal cliff. lawmakers have said that both spending cuts and new revenue need to be on the table. house speaker john boehner said that obamacare should be fair game, also. we have a fo
appropriate time, we had the new president-elect of mexico that came down here, met with members of congress and i believe at this particular time he's meeting with the president right now. president barack obama, and we look forward working with our mexican counterparts to make sure that we keep in mind that a secured strong prosperous mexico is in the best interest of the united states. mexico is not an enemy but it is a friend of the united states. and i think both benny thompson has been down to the border and michael mccaul has been down to the border. the rio grande does not unite the two countries but unites us together. also to the family of jamie zapata, losing a son is very, very difficult. and, again, we want to thank the family for providing this strong hero in a we can say jamie zapata was truly a hero of the united states. so members, i urge all my colleagues to support this bill by voting aye on h.r. 915. and with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas has announced that he'
. >> bill: allall right. now, when i pointed that out on election night that people were breaking for the president and a large part of the reason was entitlements, 'cause the below 30,000, 63% vote for barak obama, gave him 7 million in plurality and he won by 3 1/2 million popular votes. when i pointed that out. the "washington post" editorial board attacked me. my question to you as a psychiatrist now, the facts are on my side. i proved the case beyond a reasonable doubt using the facts. the exit polling, and all of the facts that we presented last night and tonight. why are they attacking me so vehemently? what is wrong with telling the american people what's going on? >> well, look, the fact is democrats did get their demographic, but that doesn't prove that they got the demographic because they're getting more stuff. i think traditionally democrats have been getting their demographic for a very long time. that skew in social class is to who gets the vote, democrat or republican, has been around for a long time. i think it's a plausible theory. i don't think it's a proven fac
question. >> jonathan, weshld not call off the next presidential election and hand it to hillary? >> that is it. >> believe it or not. let's do that. >> even if toure was channelling nate silver right now, i would say we should hold the election. >> i disagree. i disagree, jonathan. >> no way he writes a book about hillary clinton thinking secretary of state is the high point of the career. >> right. she would win. i wouldn't say 100.0%. >> i'll give you that. >> 99.5%, that's what i say. >> anyway, jonathan allen, thank you for joining us. >>> up next, the great thanksgiving getaway. stick with us for the turkey day survival guide. we are the cycle after all. we know how to move. wasn't my daughter's black bean soup spectacular? [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't relieve gas. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. gas-x. the gas xperts. >>> do you feel this vehicle is safe for highway travel? >> yes, i do. yes, i really do. i believe that. i know it's not pretty to look at but it will get you wher
parties discuss ways to solve our nation's massive debt challenge." where after this election does the house speaker if you will get the political capital to take this tact? >> well, at first, i have to point out, it's not just the day after thanksgiving, this is during the lsu game that donna and i are here. >> go tigers. >> arkansas. yes, the big game. now as to john boehner, the issue here is many of the states are opting out of state exchanges. there was a quirk when they passed the law nancy pelosi said you have to pass the law to find out what was in it, what wasn't in it is a funding mechanism for federal exchanges. many of the states are skipping state exchanges paid for by an employer mandate to either fund health care insurance for employees 50 or more or to pay a fine in effect into a state exchange. the language for funding state exchanges isn't there for the federal exchanges. something like 15 to 20 states now are opting for the federal exchange so there's no funding mechanism. so the house has to revisit this. taxing legislation has to come through the house of repre
in the election, because i could not vote for romney. i was a supporter of ron paul. unfortunately he was not the chosen candidate, and he was on your program not long ago and he spoke about social welfare. we have corporate welfare then he pointed out that is far worse than supporting the seniors or the welfare recipients. this is something that needs to be addressed, corporate welfare, which is far worse. that is what we have to stop. i hope the republican party got the message loud and clear, because the way they are presenting themselves, whether it comes to abortion or financial stuff, it's not good. thank you very much. host: this on twitter, if republicans give a dollar on taxes, they need to get $3 back in entitlements. senator seitz a chambliss came out last week against the grover norquist pledge. he told a local television station is not a word about the potential primary challenge is to be pledged to raise taxes. he says it cares more about the country than a 20-year-old pledge. he signed the taxpayer protection pledge when he first ran for senate. norquist hit back in a s
was the secretary of commerce for a couple of years, and after i negotiated salary then governor elect renegotiated a salary not upward but downward as it turns out. that's why he hasn't forgiven me. we became friends as he served in the administration, and in 1993, twenty years ago, after coming offer the statewide campaign, jeb and i were playing golf in miami and we went back to his house and i said, gee, jeb, i think that i'm considering running for governor. he said what? you're running for governor? i wouldn't do that if i were you. i'm going run for governor, we think long and hard about these things, i'm going do it. and that was in february of '93 and since that time, i've had the honor and privilege to be his partner. i was chairman of his three-gubernatorial campaigns, and we have been great friends and i have been honored to serve under his leadership. he was a principal governor, principle politician and he used every bit of his political power to work for kids who have no other advocates and for parents most of whom didn't vote for him. he was all in on education, and used every bit o
our nation's massive debt challenge. >>> a special election following jesse jackson jr.'s resignation from congress. jackson says he needs to spend time, quote, restoring my health. jackson mysteriously disappeared from capitol hill in may and his office later revealed he was dealing with depression and had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. health concerns aren't the only thing jackson is facing, though. ted rowlands is in chicago. good morning, ted. >> reporter: good morning, carol. yeah. well, the health concerns are significant. he had two stints at the mayo clinic. talking to family members, that was the main reason why he just couldn't move forward. and he gave his letter of resignation to john boehner yesterday. in that letter, though, for the first time -- this is what you were alluding to, carol, he did acknowledge he knows he is the subject of a federal investigation for possible misuse of campaign funds. and in that letter at one point he said talking about that, i'm doing my best to address the situation responsibly, cooperate with the investigators and accept responsib
plywood, pressboard made out of trees. this election made me sad. i thought we would go in the other direction and start putting people to work. why do we have millions and millions of illegal immigrants here doing jobs? if you go to a burger king, it is all mexicans. host: not feeling too optimistic about america's future right now. here is a headline from the "chicago sun-times." here is the "chicago tribune" this morning. and this is part of jesse resigning.'s letter from office. that is just a little bit of his letter and thenin "t. in "the hill" this morning -- and from "the huffington post, " this response from the white house -- that is from "the huffington coast" this morning. we are asking you about optimism for the next four years. claire in new jersey on their democrats' line. hi, claire. caller: how are you? host: what is your optimism level about america? caller: right now i am looking at 69%. host: where did you come up with 69% caller: i am from neward, new jersey. we depended on my husband working. i am working with the preschool. my son now is a police officer in atl
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